Social media addiction increases the risk of ADHD

Nonstop notifications from social media websited cause young people to have problems to concentrate for long periods of time, researchers said.

“More frequent use of digital media may be associated with development of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Symptoms,” said Professor of Preventative Medicine, Adam Leventhal of University of Southern California, in a study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association. 

Further research is needed to see whether the association is caused by social media alone but scientists suggested that the distraction and instant gratification  could aggravate the disorder.

The scientists asked 2,800 15 and 16-year-olds at 10 different schools in Los Angeles County to fill out surveys about ADHD symptoms and their social media use.

The ADHD survey asked students to evaluate whether they related to statements like “I’m easily distracted” or “I don’t listen when spoken to directly.”

The students also filled out a questionnaire ranking how often they used 14 different types of digital media, including social media sites, online games and streaming films. Students who already had ADHD symptoms were eliminated from the study. The remaining 2,600 students retook the same surveys several times over the next two years.The 495 teens who reported infrequent use of digital media had a 4.6 per cent chance of reporting ADHD symptoms. That figure almost doubled to 9.5 per cent for the 114 students who reported using seven of the 14 digital media platforms frequently.

 

Your Happiness Was Hacked: Why Tech Is Winning the Battle to Control Your Brain--and How to Fight Back

For all its significant benefits, experts explain that technology has been instrumental in eroding security, privacy, and community. Researchers Vivek Wadhwa and Alex Salkever argue that the truth is even more dangerous:: technology is actively robbing us of our happiness by making us addicted to it. Tech companies use all the weapons:  tracking bots, GPS coordinates, and algorithms that determine the optimal ways to distract us and even secret coding that defeats government monitoring and supervision. Vivek and Salkever also provide us with insights and techniques to fight back. They focus on four key areas: Love, Work, Self and Society. In each case they show how the promise of technology has mutated into addiction and despair and they present strategies to take back control by understanding the addictive mechanisms behind it.

In the UK first child to be diagnosed with Internet Gaming Addiction

The NHS (National Health Service UK) has diagnosed for the first time a 15-year-old boy with Internet Gaming Addiction .

The teenager from North London has been off school for a year after becoming addicted to gaming.

His mother, Miss Kendal Parmar, has battled for three years to have her soncondition recognised and treated by the NHS.

It comes only months after the World Health Organization (WHO) classified internet gaming as an official mental health disorder and brings hope to parents with children in a similar situation.

“I call it a silent addiction,” Kendal told The Telegraph. “If you were shooting up in a park, everyone would care a lot more because it disrupts society. If he was drunk and driving a motorbike, everyone would care. But no-one cares if he is sitting in his bedroom.”